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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

TOBACCO REPORT 

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THE BULLETl 
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Norf-h Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. y. Ballentine, Commissioner 



Number 151 



March, 1958 



NORTH CAROLINA 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
John L. Reitzel, Assistant Commissioner 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

W. I. BISSETTE Grifton 

Glenn G. Gilmore Julian 

HOYLE C. Griffin Monroe 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

J. Muse McCotter New Bern 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

A. B. Slagle Franklin 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Tobacco Outlook for 1958 5 

Burley Growers Position Improving Slowly 10 

State Summary 1957-1958 14 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report for 

Season 1957-1958 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales 1957-1958 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco 

by States 1957 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts 1957 18 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 1919-1957 19 

North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1957 20 

North Carolina Tobacco Allotments 1958 21 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

by Belts and Markets 1957 24 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption by Kinds 1957 Back Cover 



FOREWORD 

This ninth annual issue of the Tobacco Report has 
been compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and 
J H. Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of 
Markets, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture under the Research and Marketing Act. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting 
Service of the North Carolina and United States De- 
partments of Agriculture, and the Tobacco Branch of 
the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service for much 
of the statistical data contained herein. 

This issue of the Tobacco Report is dedicated to 
manufacturers all over the world who buy and use 
North Carolina flue-cured tobacco. Both domestic and 
foreign manufacturers know that it takes the finest 
quality tobacco, having full flavor and aroma, for 
products that will meet consumer acceptance. 




Commissioner of Agriculture 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 
Markets Division, North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



3/58-6M 



Tobacco Outlook for 1958 



As flue-cured growers throughout the Bright Belt marked up 
the past season as a disappointing chapter in their Book of 
Experience, they could take heart from distant prospects but 
find little to cheer about in the immediate outlook for 1958. 

The most encouraging development of the 1957 season was the 
fact that for the first time since 1949 production in the Bright 
Belt was less than the disappearance of flue-cured stocks. Only 
984 million pounds were produced, and 1,140 million pounds went 
into domestic and export channels of trade. Continuation of this 
pattern for one or two more years might reduce surplus stocks 
to a normal carry-over. 

The advent of 1958 found the tobacco grower in the midst of 
a long-term revolution, involving surplus stocks, acreage cuts, 
changes in production practices, changes in buying patterns and 
price differentials. Already bewildered by the tremendous 
changes of the past few years, the only thing he could be sure 
of in the future was still more change. 

Before planting the 1957 crop the grower was told that the 
demand would be for heavy-bodied, aromatic tobacco to meet 
the needs of the export trade and domestic requirements for 
filter tip cigarettes. When the crop turned out to contain a large 
proportion of this type of tobacco much of it was allowed to 
go into Stabilization stocks at government support prices. This 
dampened any hopes of an early increase in production quotas. 

The 1958 national flue-cured allotment of 713,000 acres, as 
announced by the Secretary of Agriculture on November 25, 
compares with an allotment of 712,000 acres in 1957. The slight 
increase allows only for minor adjustments; for all practical 
purposes, individual allotments remain the same. 

Prospects are that allotments Vv^ill continue at present levels 
until there is further improvement in the position of stocks. On 
July 1, 1958, the carry-over should total about 2,360 million 
pounds. With allotments the same, another factor had to be con- 
sidered — the extent of participation in the Soil Bank. On March 
7, the cut-off date for participation, 10 percent of the acreage 
had been signed into the Soil Bank. With acreage yields of 1,500 



pounds, the prospective 1958 crop would be 960 million pounds. 
This, plus the carry-over, adds up to a 3.1 years' supply in spite 
of the lowest production in 14 years and the smallest acreage in 
25 years. 



Table 1. Price Support Operations for Specified Periods 







Price 


Placed under loan 


Remaining in 




Parity 


Support 


Quantity 


Percentage loan stocks on 


Year 


Price 


Level 




of Crop 


Jan. 1, 1958 




Cents 


Cents 


Million lbs. 




Million lbs. 


1951 


56.3 


50.7 


142.2 


9.8 





1952 


56.2 


50.6 


165.0 


12.1 





1953 


53.2 


47.9 


151.4 


11.9 





1954 


53.2 


47.9 


130.3 


9.9 


36.6 


1955 


53.7 


48.3 


298.9 


20.2 


238.0 


1956 


54.3 


48.9 


319.9 


22.5 


248.3 


1957 


56.5 


50.8 


107.8 


10.9 


107.8 



For the first time since 1951 the Stabilization Corporation has 
held a smaller inventory on January 1st, 630 million pounds, 
than was held a year earher, 673 million pounds. This indicates 
the tobacco program is headed in the right direction. In the 
past growers have attempted to overcome acreage cuts by the 
use of high yielding varieties and resorted to closer planting 
and high rates of fertilization. Even these methods have back- 
fired, resulting in increased disease problems and the production 
of tobacco which carried a discount in support price on the sales 
floor. 

The variety discount program in efi'ect for the 1957 crop will 
be continued, and prices for the 1958 crop of Coker 139-140 and 
Dixie Bright 244 will be supported at one-half the support rates 
for comparable grades of other varieties. 

The confusion growing out of the discount program proved 
not only alarming to growers but to the industry as a whole. To 
get the best advice possible for growers, an industry-wide meet- 
ing was held with buyers from manufacturers and exporters, 
research and tobacco workers attending. Here are their recom- 
mendations for 1958: 

"Since 95 per cent of flue-cured tobacco is used in ciga- 
rettes, growers should strive to produce ripe, mellow tobacco 
with medium body, rich clear color, and possessing full flavor 




Proper lighting for farm sorting more than pays for itself, as it aids in 
getting the tobacco into more uniform grades. 



and aroma. They should harvest tobacco only when ripe, 
irrespective of variety, and should avoid practices that re- 
sult in heavy-bodied, leathery tobacco. It is generally agreed 
that the best way to produce tobacco with qualities accept- 
able to the trade is to follow recommendations of State and 
Federal agencies." 

To meet these requirements seed breeders and research people 
offered growers several new varieties of tobacco seed this year. 
The new varieties are promising and should go far in eliminating 
undesirable tobacco from the market. 

Changes in the buying patterns have not only confused the 
grower, but have caused the manufacturers some concern, for 
they do not know to what extent filter tips will take the consumer 
market. The output of cigarettes during 1957 was 441 billion 
pieces, or the highest number in history. Although the number 
of cigarettes manufactured reached a new high, the amount of 
flue-cured tobacco used to make them has continued downward. 
Filter tips require less tobacco per unit of output than non-filter 



tips. Filters have grown from one per cent of the market in 1952 
to 40 per cent in 1957. This type cigarette requires not only less 
tobacco but a different type of tobacco from the regular non- 
filter. So the manufacture is as perplexed as the grower as to 
what kind of tobacco to buy and how much. 1958 will no doubt 
see leading buyers, both domestic and export, trying to buy the 
same type of tobacco. 

Where the grower is affected by the changes in consumer 
preference for one type of cigarette over the other is the amount 
of tobacco used by the domestic manufacturer. Several years 
ago it took one pound of tobacco to make 335 cigarettes. Today 
with filter tips and shorter cigarette tubes one pound of tobacco 
will manufacture 360 cigarettes. If during the past three years 
cigarettes had required on the average as much leaf as formerly, 
an additional 250 million pounds of tobacco would have been 
used. Another factor that has held down the amount of leaf in 
cigarettes is the increasing use of processed-sheet tobacco which 
utilizes stems. This factor, and new and more efficient machinery, 
have reduced the loss or waste between purchase on the ware- 
house floor and the final stage of cigarette manufacture. Since 
cigarettes absorb 95 per cent of the flue-cured crop the only 
chance for increased use is in increased consumption of ciga- 
rettes. As our population increases it is expected that cigarette 
consumption will rise. 

Exports of flue-cured tobacco have remained fairly constant 
for the past five years, from a low of 431 million pounds in 1953 

Table 2. Flue-Cured Tobacco, Types 11-14: Domestic Supplies, 
Disappearance, Season Average Price 

(Farm-sales weight) 



Year 


Production 


St"cks 
July 1 


Supply- 


Disappearance 
Total Domestic Exports 


Average 

price 
per pound 




Million lbs. 


Million lbs. 


Million lbs. 


Million lbs. Million lbs. 


Million 


lbs. Certs 


1951 


1,453 


1,557 


3,010 


1,279 777 


502 


52.4 


1952 


1,365 


1,731 


3,096 


1,244 828 


416 


50.3 


1953 


1,272 


1,852 


8,124 


1,209 778 


431 


52.8 


1954 


1,314 


1,915 


3,229 


1,173 744 


429 


52.7 


1955 


1,483 


2,056 


3,539 


1,281 728 


553 


52.7 


1956 


1,423 


2,258 


3,581 


1,170 705 


465 


51.5 


1957 


984 


2,511 


3,495 


*1,160 *700 


-460 


-55.3 



Estimated 



to a high of 553 million pounds in 1955. In 1956 our exports 
were 465 million pounds, with England, our best customer, 
taking 130 million pounds during the first eight months of the 
year. Exports to Germany, our next leading customer, were up 
12 per cent over a year earlier. However the chances of increases 
during 1958 are slight. A decline of about five per cent is more 
or less likely, as the small crop of 1957 may have been short 
in some export grades and prices on some grades of export to- 
bacco have averaged higher than the previous year. 

The 1958 flue-cured crop will be supported at 90 per cent of 
parity. The base price for calculating parity will be higher than 
in 1957. If the parity index remains near the current level, the 
support price will be about $53.34 for 1958. 

Remember that growers will be called upon to vote again in 
1958 on the tobacco acreage program for the next three years. 
Without this program it is probable that the prices of tobacco 
would decline at least 50 per cent. There would be heavy over- 
production that could create a serious economic problem for 
years to come. Growers should give very serious thought to the 
importance of a program that has served them well for the last 
23 years. Older growers will remember how prices dropped to 
an average of 16 cents per pound when the program was voted 
out in 1939 — and how anxious they were to vote the program 
back in 1940. Let's all rally behind the tobacco program and en- 
courage the growers to continue to uphold our slogan : "North 
Carolina produces the world's finest tobacco and tobacco 
products." 



Burley Growers^ Position 
Improving Slowly 



Burley tobacco growers, through their wilhngness to sacrifice 
acres to strengthen their program, are gradually digging out 
from under a large burley surplus that reached a peak in 1954. 
Acreage allotments were reduced 25 per cent in 1955 and re- 
mained at this level in 1956 and 1957. The quotas announced for 
1958 will be the same as they have been for the past three years. 
There was some sentiment in certain segments of the industry 
for an acreage increase this year, but this could not be justified 
in the face of the large supply of burley already on hand. 

Before acreage was cut by 25 per cent in 1955, burley supplies 
were at a record level of 1,866 million pounds, which was a 3.6 
years' supply, based on the total disappearance at that time. 
After three years of reduced quotas the total supply had dimin- 
ished only 77 million pounds. This brought the total supply of 
burley for 1957 down to 1,789 million pounds, which is still about 
a 3.5 years' supply based on the current disappearance. 

Table I 

Burley Type 31, Production, Carryover, Total Supply, and 
Domestic and Export Disappearance — 1952-1957 

Production Carryover Oct. 1 Supply Domestic Use Exports 
Year (Mil. lbs.) (Mil. lbs.) (Mil. lbs.) (Mil. lbs.) (Mil. lbs.) 

1952 650 1,061 1,711 519 29 



1953 


564 


1,163 


1,727 


494 


35 


1954 


668 


1,198 


1,866 


486 


33 


1955 


470 


1,347 


1,817 


482 


34 


1956 


506 


1,301 


1,807 


480 


28 


1957 


490 


1,299 


1,789 


-478 


*28 



* Estimate for 1957. ^ 

It is evident from Table I that the total disappearance has 
been slowing down since 1952. A large proportion of burley is 
used in the manufacture of cigarettes and, although the con- 
sumption of cigarettes has increased, the amount of burley leaf 

10 




Staking burley in the field after cutting is a bad practice, because the 
tobacco will likely be damaged by rain and dirt on the top leaves. 

used has not shown a corresponding increase. This is due to 
consumer use of filter tips and improved manufacturing techni- 
ques. 

A sizeable amount of burley is used in smoking and chewing 
tobacco. Use of these products has shown a constant decrease 
for the past few years. If consumer income remains high, it is 
unlikely that there will be an appreciable rise in the purchase of 
smoking or chewing tobacco in the near future. 

Exports have remained fairly constant for the past six years. 
Immediately following World War II burley growers were in the 
enviable position of having stocks on hand to supply countries 
short of tobacco. It was expected that the demand would continue 
due to the introduction of blended cigarettes in foreign countries. 
This fact did not materialize, primarily because of the price 
factor from foreign-grown burley. The substantial increase in 
prices of certain grades in the past few years has tended to 
reduce exports to some foreign markets. 



n 



Government Loan Stocks 

The stocks of burley tobacco held in the pool under govern- 
ment loan showed some improvement during the past year. The 
total stocks under government loan at the close of the 1956-57 
market were about 380 milhon pounds. At the end of the 1957- 
58 selling season, pool stocks had dropped to about 291 million 
pounds. 

Table II 

Remaining Stocks of Burley Under Goyernment- Loan By 

Years at the End of the 1957-58 Selling Season 







(F 


arm 


Sales Weight) 








Placed Under Loan 


19 


Loan Stocks End 


Year 


Quantity 






Percentage 


57-58 Selling Season 


1951 


97.3 mil. 


lbs. 


15.7 




3.1 mil. lbs. 


1952 


103.9 






16.0 




4.1 


1953 


102.1 






17.9 




42.2 


1954 


221.4 






33.2 




147.0 


1955 


73.1 






15.6 




72.6 


1956 


6.0 






1.2 




5.7 


1957 


16.6 






3.2 




16.6 










Total- 


291.3 mil. lbs. 



It should be noted from Table II that the amount of tobacco 
going under Government loan increased considerably in 1957 
as compared with 1956, even though the 1957 crop was smaller 
than the 1956 crop. Approximately 85 per cent of the burley to- 
bacco going under loan during the past season was made up of 
the following grades: X3F, X4F, C3F, C4F, C5F, B2F, and B4F. 

Burley Market Trends 

It seems that burley growers reached the crest of a price rise 
in 1956, when the burley market averaged $63.61 per hundred. 
In the 1957 season many grade prices reached a record high 
during the second week of sales, but a large number of grades 
showed a continuous price decline from the third week of sales 
until the end of the season. 

In the last two or three years the price spread between the 
various grades has become narrower. The narrowest spread 
among grades occurred during the 1956 marketing season. Table 
III shows a comparison of the price difference between the 
burley grade of C3F, which is considered one of the top cigarette 
grades, and the prices of other selected grades. 

12 



Table III 

Price Spread Between C3F and Other Selected Grades of 
Burley, 1953-1957. 
Price per lb. C3F 



1953 




1954 




1955 




1956 




1957 




(Cents) 


(Cents) 




(Cents) 




(Cents) 




(Cents) 


67 




65 




65 




66 




67 




Price differential 


between C3F and: 




















(Cents less) 










1953 




1954 




1955 




1956 




1957 


X4F 


2 




3 




3 




1 




1 


B3F 


7 




9 




4 









3 


X4R 


11 




13 




7 




3 




5 


C5R 


13 




15 




7 




2 




7 


B5F 


16 




18 




8 




1 




7 


B4R . 


29 




82 




12 




1 




10 


T4R 


37 




37 




16 




2 




13 


NIG 


53 




50 




30 




14 




29 



According to data in Table III, the price spread between C3F 
and NIG, which is the lowest grade under price support, was 53 
cents in 1953. The spread between those same grades in 1956 
was only 14 cents. However, the trend in 1957 was toward a 
wider spread between the common and better grades. 

This trend toward a wider spread between poor and better 
grades will likely continue during 1958, which is an indication 
that quality will become an important factor again in the burley 
market. Therefore, growers should concentrate on producing 
quality tobacco in 1958, instead of quantity, in order to receive 
the greatest returns from their crop. 



13 



State Summary 1957-1958 



The 1957 income from flue-cured tobacco in North Carolina dropped to 
the lowest level since 1949, even though the average price paid for the 1957 
crop was the second highest on record. 

The hurley market showed a steady decline in demand throughout the 
season. However, the N. C. hurley market average was second only to the 

1956 record. 

North Carolina flue-cured tobacco growers sold 633,700,390 pounds of 
tobacco in 1951 on the 44 markets operating in the state. They received 
$350,966,656 from their sales, which gave them a 1951 season average of 
$55.38 per hundred. In 1956 producers sold 938,279,677 pounds for $486,106,- 
100, averaging $51.81 per hundred. The 1957 average price was $3.57 higher 
than the 1956 average, but producer sales were 304,579,287 pounds less in 

1957 than the previous year, which resulted in a drop of $135,139,444 in 
value of sales compared with 1956. 

Type 13 — The eight North Carolina Border Belt Markets opened for the 
1957 season on July 30, which was three days earlier than the 1956 opening. 
The general quality of offerings was better than in 1956, but the volume was 
the smallest in 14 years. The average price paid for most grades was higher 
than the previous year, and a large number of grades set new record high 
averages. Increases in grade averages ranged from $1.00 to $13.00 per 
hundred. The largest increases in price were among the medium and lower 
quality grades, and the weakest demand was for good to choice cutters 
and lugs. 

Growers selling tobacco on the North Carolina Border Belt Markets in 
1957 received $67,383,608 for 112,998,465 pounds of tobacco, which resulted 
in a record high season average of $59.63 per hundred. In 1956 growers in 
this belt sold 156,397,606 pounds for $85,951,098, averaging $54.96 per 
hundred. The volume of sales in 1957 was 43,399,141 pounds less than the 
1956 sales, which resulted in a $18,567,490 drop in value of sales. Final sales 
were held in this belt on September 26, which made it one of the shortest 
seasons in several years, with only 44 sale days. In 1956 the selling season 
extended over a period of 53 days. 

Type 12 — The 1957 auction sales on the 17 Eastern Belt Markets began 
on August 15, which was eight days earlier than the 1956 opening. The 
quality of off^erings was lower than the previous year, with much larger 
quantities of green and red tobacco, and considerably less lemon and orange 
tobacco. However, practically all grade prices showed increases over the 
previous year, which ranged from $1.00 to $15. 0€ per hundred. 

Producer sales in this belt were down to 317,359,121 pounds in 1957, com- 
pared with 477,816,430 pounds in 1956. Growers' receipts from the 1957 
sales totaled $173,876,613 which was $73,777,432 less than in 1956. The 
average price paid for the 1951 Eastern Belt Crop was $54.79 per hundred, 
compared with the 1956 average of $51.83 per hundred. Markets began 
closing in this belt on October 15, and final sales were held on November 

14 



8. The season extended over a period of 61 sale days, which was the same 
number of days as the 1956 season. 

Type 11 B— The Middle Belt Markets held first sales of the 1957 season 
on August 29, which was the earliest opening since 1954. The quality of 
offerings was lower than the previous year, but about 90 9f of the grades 
showed price increases ranging up to $14.00 per hundred. In contrast to 
the 1956 season, the thinner bodied tobacco was in strongest demand in this 
belt. The demand was weaker on many of the heavy leaf grades, which were 
down $1.00 to $3.00 compared with the previous year. 

Season producer sales amounted to 111,212,560 pounds, retarning the grow- 
ers $59,552,006 and averaging $53.55 per hundred. In 1956 growers averaged 
$52.34 for 166,773,328 pounds of tobacco, which returned them $87,289,095. 
All of the 10 markets in this belt had completed their 1957 season by 
November 27, covering a period of 63 sale days compared with 61 during 
the 1956 season. 

Type 11 A — The nine North Carolina Old Belt Markets started their 1957 
auctions on September 10. The general quality of the crop was slightly 
lower than the previous year, but a large percentage of the grades showed 
price increases ranging from $1.00 to $12.00 per hundred. The market show- 
ed a continuous decline in demand for heavy bodied leaf grades from the 
middle of September until the end of the season, while the demand for 
primings and lugs increased. 

North Carolina Old Belt farmers received $50,154,429 for 92,130,244 
pounds, averaging $54.51 per hundred. In 1956 these growers received 
$65,211,862 for 137,292,313 pounds of tobacco, averaging only $47.50 per 
hundred. Final sales were held in the North Carolina Old Belt Markets on 
December 6, after operating for 62 days. 

Type 31 — The three North Carolina Burley Markets at Asheville, Boone 
and West Jeiferson set a new record for early openings when they opened 
for the 1957-58 season on November 25. In general the quality was not as 
good as the previous year, due to dry growing conditions in some areas 
and a wet curing season which caused some damage. Average prices on 
most of the heavier, lower quality grades declined. Leaf grades showed 
losses of $1.00 to $14.00 per hundred; tips and heavier bodied non-descript 
grades ranged as much as $17.00 lower. A few thin lug, flying and light 
nondescript grades were $1.00 to $2.00 higher compared with the previous 
year. 

The North Carolina burley markets sold 16,746,334 pounds of tobacco for 
growers who received $9,774,301 for a season average of $58.37. In 1956 
producer sales amounted to 15,405,060 pounds at an average of $61.84 per 
hundred, which returned growers $9,527,243. The Burley Markets in North 
Carolina had completed the 1957-58 season by January 21, 1958, covering 
32 sale days compared with 25 the previous year. 



15 






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Summary of N. C. Dealer and Warehouse 
Resales -1957-1958 



Belt 



Pounds 



Dollars 



Ave. Price 



Percentage 
Resales 



Border Belt- 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Eastern Belt- 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Middle Belt- 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Old Belt- 
Dealer 
Warehouse 

Hurley Belt- 
Dealer 
Warehouse 



4,727,914 
10,351,844 


$ 2,165,931 
5,935,219 


$45.81 
57.33 


3.7 
8.1 


10,971,794 
25,148,101 


4,771,206 
13,327,632 


43.49 
53.00 


3.1 
7.1 


5.058,434 
8,183,600 


2,230.424 
4.280,479 


44.09 
52.31 


4.1 
6.6 


4,717,890 
7,236,844 


2,219,503 
3,800.317 


47.04 
52.51 


4.5 
7.0 


583,226 
1,943,498 


298,556 
1,050,949 


51.19 
54.08 


3.0 
10.1 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue Cured 
Tobacco By States -1957 



Prodrcer Sales 



State 



Pounds 



Ave. Price 



Gross Sales 



Pounds 



Ave. Price 



N. C 633,700,390 

Va 122,489,511 

S. C 109,407,199 

Ga 93,919,567 

Fla 13.179,996 

TOTAL 972,696,663 



$55.38 
51.11 
59.78 
56.23 

56.78 

$55.44 



710,096,811 
131.006,069 
126,352,985 
104.712.848 
15.270.794 

1.087,439,507 



$54.88 
50.94 
59.16 
55.77 
56.66 

$55.02 



SfabiSization Receipts By Belts- 1957 



Belt 



Type 



Producer Sales 
(Pounds) 



Stabilization 
Receipts (lbs.) 



Percentage 
Stab. Received 



Old Belt 11 A 

Middle Belt 11 B 

Eastern Belt 12 

Border Belt 13 

Ga.-Fla. Belt 14 

TOTALS '.11-14 



214,619,755 


58.204.880 


27.12 


111,212,560 


18.225.433 


16.38 


317,359.121 


21,419,684 


6.74 


222,405,664 


8,880,374 


3.99 


107,099,563 


1,076,660 
107,807,031 


1.01 


972,696,663 


9.02 



18 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919-1957* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,70€ 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,341 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957** 


443,000 


1,484 


657,295 


363,437 


55.30 



* Source: N. C. and U. S. D. A. 

* Preliminary for 1957. 



Crop Reporting Service. 



19 



North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1957 



Year 


No. Acres 


Yield Per 

Acre 
(Pounds) 


Production 
(1,000 lbs.) 


Value 
(1,000 Dollars) 


Average 
Price 


1928 


3,6€0 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957*='= 


9,400 


2,000 


18,800 


10,970 


58.35 



Source: N. C. and U. S. D. A. Crop Reporting Service. 
Estimate of Division of Markets based on producer sales. 



20 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 

1958 



County No. Farms Acres Rank 



Alamance 1,425 

Alexander 964 

Anson 265 

Beaufort 2,552 

Bertie 1,870 

Bladen 3,487 

Brunswick 1,868 

Cabarrus 1 

Caldwell 269 

Camden 2 

Carteret 424 

Caswell 1,965 

Catawba 4 

Chatham 1,112 

Chowan 198 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus 5,290 

Craven 1,872 

Cumberland 2,497 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1,767 

Davie 805 

Duplin 4,789 

Durham 1,050 

Edgecombe 1,617 

Forsyth 2,193 

Franklin 2,914 

Gaston 1 

Gates 125 

Granville 2,157 

Greene 1,244 

Guilford 3,179 

Halifax 2,280 

Harnett 3,944 

Hertford 1,045 

Hoke 1,000 

Iredell 798 

Johnston 5,870 

Jones 944 

Lee 1,346 



4,694 


86 


1,385 


50 


394 


61 


9,501 


21 


5,670 


32 


7,395 


28 


3,277 


42 


0.03 


72 


476 


59 


5 


66 


1,344 


51 


9,117 


23 


5 


65 


2,919 


46 


542 


58 


0.35 


70 


16,338 


7 


8,462 


24 


5,213 


34 


0.07 


71 


3,258 


43 


1,171 


53 


15,421 


8 


3,861 


39 


11,418 


16 


4,901 


35 


11,354 


18 


5 


67 


267 


62 


13,241 


13 


11,929 


15 


9,123 


22 


5,854 


31 


14,497 


10 


3,214 


45 


2,833 


47 


1,212 


52 


22,446 


2 


5,381 


33 


4,075 


38 



21 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 
1958-Confr'd. 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Lenoir 1,939 13,874 12 

Martin 1,683 8,416 25 

Mecklenburg 1 0.5 69 

Montgomery 430 962 56 

Moore 1,565 4,589 37 

Nash 3,128 18,028 5 

New Hanover 91 214 63 

Northampton 227 469 60 

Onslow 1,919 6,216 29 

Orange 920 3,280 41 

Pamlico 435 1,092 55 

Pender 1,742 3,238 44 

Person 1,798 9,561 20 

Pitt 2,717 25,138 1 

Randolph 1,604 3,280 40 

Richmond 1,056 2,075 48 

Robeson 4,892 20,553 3 

Rockingham 3,094 12,941 14 

Rowan 36 47 64 

Sampson 5,617 15,143 9 

Scotland 538 1,151 54 

Stokes 2,810 11,421 17 

Surry 3,229 10,858 19 

Tyrrell 2 2 68 

Vance 1,523 8,069 26 

Wake 4,007 19,300 4 

Warren 2,012 6,076 30 

Washington 299 952 57 

Wayne 3,152 14,423 11 

Wilkes 987 1,536 49 

Wilson 2,225 16,666 6 

Yadkin 2,759 8,002 27 

123,572 469,780 1-72 



22 



N. C. Burley Tobacco Allof-menf-s-1958 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Alleghany 475 217.44 9 

Ashe 2,403 1,104.19 5 

Avery 245 112.69 11 

Brunswick 1 0.10 34 

Buncombe 8,€40 1,639.59 2 

Burke 11 4.30 22 

Caldwell 24 9.93 20 

Catawba 4 1.40 26 

Cherokee 168 62.47 15 

Clay 194 81.33 12 

Cleveland 9 2.90 23 

Davidson 3 1.37 27 

Gaston 1 .67 30 

Graham 705 341.43 8 

Granville 1 0.10 34 

Haywood 2,009 1,140.29 3 

Henderson 118 . 46.51 16 

Iredell 4 1.70 25 

Jackson 310 121.14 10 

Lincoln 2 0.30 33 

McDowell 85 , 27.28 19 

Macon 217 66.43 14 

Madison 2,995 2,566.27 1 

Mitchell 936 512.76 7 

Polk 6 1.50 24 

Randolph 1 0.60 31 

Rutherford 66 29.81 18 

Stokes 2 0.30 32 

Surry 8 0.90 29 

Swain 215 69.92 13 

Transylvania 66 32.29 17 

Watauga 1,586 796.54 6 

Wilkes 24 3.70 21 

Yadkin 1 0.10 28 

Yancey 1,900 1,133.68 4 

17,835 10,131.93 1-34 



23 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses 
and Operators By Belts and Markets 

1957 

N. C. BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Producers — A. E. & Jack Garrett 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
Green-Teachey — Charlie Teachey, J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf — J. H. Bryant, B. F. Rivenbark 
New Bladen— E. C. Huff, W. McDuffie, N. Cox 
Clarkton Whse.— J. J. Webster, O. C. Blanchard 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell & Sons 
Planters — N. N. Love, Carl Meares 
Littleton's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Littleton 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Robeson County — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Peoples — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Mitchell-Davis— F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Frys No. 1 & 2— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Holliday— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Planters No. 1 & 2— G. R. Royster 

Square Deal 1-2-3— W. G. Bassett 

Star-Carolina 1-2-3— C. A. Blankenship, W. G. Sheets, W. M. Puckett 

Twin State 1-2-3— P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson 

Liberty — F. P. Joyce, Joe Pell 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2— R. H. Barbour, P. L. Campbell 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Towsend, J. Johnson 
Smith-Dixie— N. A. McKeithan, E. K. Biggs 
Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. E. Wilkens, R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

24 



Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — Jimmy Morgan, Clyde Roberts, Ralph Stephens 
Brooks— Blair Motley, Jr., G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 
Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield, Blair Motley, Jr. 
Lea's No. 1 & 2 — William Townes Lea, Louie Price 
Moores— A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 
Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 
Planters No. 1 & 2— A. 0. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 
Farmers — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 
Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 
Carolina — Ralph C. Stephens, Walter Clark 
Liberty — J. W. Hooks, Carl Bryan 
Warren's — W. C. & J. I. Warren 

EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight— No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — ^Morris Bros., W. M. Odom 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Mrs. McWhorter Hamilton, L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers — H. A. Carr, J. A. Chesnut, J. J. Hill 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse— E. L. Dudley, T. B. Smothers, O. G. Calhoun 
Planters — A. B. Currin 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's— Mrs. L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey 
Farmers — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Fountains — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Monk's No. 1 & 2— J. Y. Monk, R. D. Rouse 
Planters — M. J. Moye, Chester Worthington 
Prewitts— B. S. Correll & C. Prewitt 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith 

Farmers No. 1 & 2— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Littleton— O. L. Littleton, H. C. Whitley 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Planters Coop. — Elbert Bennett, Mgr. 

McGowan's No. 1 & 2— C. H. McGowan 

Morton's— W. Z. Morton 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Floyd McGowan 

New Independent — Bob Cullipher, F. F. Pollard 

Grower's — G. B. Jones 

Star— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 



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Greenville — Cont'd. 

Raynor & Harris — C. C. Harris, James W. Reavis 

Keels — W. S. Edwards 

Harris & Rogers — R. E. Rogers 

Kinston (four full sets buyers — fifth set incomplete) 
Central — J. E. Jones, W. I. Herring- 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins 

Kinston Cooperative 1 & 2 — D. W. Hodges, Mgr. 
Knott Warehouse, Inc. — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knotts Nevi^— H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2 — R. E. Sheppard 
New Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 
The Star Warehouse — C. J. Herring 
Banner— K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Adkins & Bailey— I. M. Little, R. K. Adkins 

New Red Front— J. H. Gray, J. W. Peay 

Planters No. 1 & 2— H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, J. C. Carlton 

Mangum— Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3— W. B. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2— James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 
Big Planters — J. B. Wooten 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — G. G. Adams, W. L. Kennedy 
Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 
Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 
Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clarks No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — 0. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3 — G. D. Bennett, Joe Bryant 
Sheffield's— Garland & John Sheffield 



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Washington (one set buyers) 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson, Harry McMullin 
Hassell-Edwards 1 & 2— M. M. Hassell, W. S. Edv/ards 
Farmers Whse. Inc. — Jack Douglas 

Wendell (two sets buyers) 

Farmers — L. R. Clark & Son 

Central — Northside — G. Dean, J. H. Sanders 

Planters — Walter Walker 

Liberty 1 & 2— H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin, J. W. Dale 

Star— Curtis Walker 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie— E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3— Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc., A B & C— H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Carolina 1 & 2— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Farmer— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Planters — J. W. Gurkin, J. R. Rogers 
Roanoke-Dixie — J. W. Gurkin, J. R. Rogers 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Planters 1 & 2— C. B. & B. U. Griffin, J. D. & Charles Marshall 
Heckstall— E. D. Wiggins, Mack Hux 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — George Mabe, Tom Faulkner 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells— W. C. Fox, O. P. Littleton 
Victory — R. L. Comer, Jimmy Morgan 
Hobgood's— O. T. Hobgood, L. B. Maddox 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty— John & Walker Stone 

Roycroft— H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 

Star-Brick — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 

Farmers — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Planters— J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 



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Ellerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — L. G. Dewitt, Monroe Fagg 
Richmond County — W. H. & H. P. Rummage 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Big Top— King Roberts, E. E. Clayton 
New Deal— W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Goldleaf — R. H. Barbour, Sherrill Akins 
Liberty — P. L. Campbell 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Carolina— M. S. High, F. V. Hicks 

Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 

Farmers — W. J. Alston 

High Price— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Liberty — George T. Robertson 

Ellington— F. H. Ellington & Sons 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 
Southside A & B— Charlie Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner— W. L. Mitchell, Jr., David Mitchell 

Mangum — Farmers — T. B. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott, Joe 

Cutts 
Fleming No. 1 & 2— G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin, H. G. Taylor 
Planters— C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 
Johnson— C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 
Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 
Granville — L. S. Bryan, W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Big Sanford — Joe M. Wilkins, Hazel Thomas 
Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2— W. F. Wood 
Pucketts No. 1 & 2— C. W. Puckett 
Farmers — W. F. Wood 
Twin City— W. M. Carter, T. V. Mansfield 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 
Center No. 1 & 2— M. D. Carroll 
Currin's No. 1 & 2— D. G. Currin, C. W. Currin 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 

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I 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Jule Allen, Bill & Jack McCauley 
Coble— N. C. Newman, L. 0. Winstead, R. W. Rainey 
Farmers — Jule Allen, Bill & Jack McCauley 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 
Guilford County Whse. Co.— H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Carolina— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Sharp & Smith— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers — W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Harris 1 & 2 — C. A. Harris, Blaine Gorrell 
Planters— J. G. McCray, J. B. Keck, R. D. Tickle 
Piedmont — Joe W. Dillard 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

New Dixie 1 & 2 — Oscar L. Badgett 

Liberty — R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin, Dave Smith 
Planters & Jones — Tom and Frank Jones, Buck White 
Lovills — Hunters — J. W., J. L. Hunter 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Browns— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Farmers— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Watts — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers— T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstalf , R. L. Hester 

Hyco — W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, Geo. Walker 

Foacre— H. W. Winstead, Jr., J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Planters No. 1 & 2— T. 0. Pass 

Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Brown's No. 1 & 2 — 0. P. Joyce, Roy Carter 
Farmers — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 
Piedmont — J. J. Webster, G. D. Rakestraw 
Slate No. 1 & 2— F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 
Powell — Elmer, Dillard, Marvin Powell 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina — H. M. Bouldin, G. H. Robertson 



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Winston-Salem — Cont'd. 

Dixie— Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J, R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 

Farmers — Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 

Glenn Co.— C. T. Glenn, D. L. Harris, Chas. Dalton 

Liberty— M. M. Joyner, J. R. Pell, W. G. Sheets, Floyd Joyce 

Pepper No. 1 & 2— F. D, Pepper 

Planters — Foss Smithdeal, Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 

Taylor— Paul Taylor, J. H. Dyer 

Big Winston— R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, William Fowler, H. A. 

Thomas 
George-Davis — Foss & Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 

N. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Carolina — Max Roberts, Mgr. 
Dixie No. 1 & 2— J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart 
Bernard- Walker Warehouses — James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Big Burley— J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill, 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — Joe E. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Planters— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Jarrell's— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 



30